Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Musical Journey of Classical Pianist Rueibin Chen

Musical Journey of Classical Pianist Rueibin Chen

This video shares some of Rueibin’s performances through the years, and contains excerpts from interviews where he recollects his musical journey and experiences from childhood, and also talks about his current visions. Hope you like the video.







Wednesday, December 14, 2016

It is always fun to work with talented young musicians!


Renowned Pianist Rueibin Chen Calls for Taiwan to Use Arts for Diplomacy


Interview by The News Lens November 2016

“He plays with white-hot energy, steel-fingered, power and athletic virtuosity…has impetuosity and undeniably impressive technique.” – The Boston Globe.
“He mesmerized the audience as his fingers traveled the ivories with at times mind-boggling precision and swiftness and a level of emotion which delivered each note, each chord, to the heart of each member of the audience.” – The Times.

These are just two examples of the praise world-renowned Taiwanese pianist Rueibin Chen (陳瑞斌) has received during his career as a concert pianist.
As late Russian pianist Lazar Berman’s only disciple of Asian descent, Chen has toured all over the world, performing in major concert halls such as Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center in New York City, Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, the Sydney Opera House and the Hong Kong Cultural Center to name a few.

He was invited to be the opening soloist in the 2010 World Expo in China, and in 2014 was invited to perform with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl, the biggest outdoor venue in the U.S. In the same year, Chen was also the only piano soloist invited to perform during the Beijing International Film Festival ceremonies.

But while the pianist has been applauded for his talent and success, in an interview with The News Lens International, Chen stresses the lack of attention the Taiwanese government has given to cultivating arts and culture over the past decades.
“The classical music culture in Taiwan took-off later [than other countries], mostly because government policies didn’t provide support for musicians,” said Chen. “Musicians were all on their own.”

At the age of 13, Chen was selected by the Taiwanese government in a national talent search and was sent to Vienna, Austria, where studied at the Vienna Conservatory. However, the pianist says that other than a passport, the government did not offer any other support.
“My family supported me financially until I was 16, but after that I had to find ways to provide for myself,” says Chen.

Through entering and winning competitions, the pianist was able to live off prize money and, in the process, gradually made a name for himself. But Chen says he noticed at these competitions, contestants from China were usually accompanied by government officials.
Though the pianist has not been supported by the Taiwanese government, he has been striving to introduce Taiwanese and Chinese cultures overseas through the way he is most familiar with – music.

Chen says he is able to connect with the mainstream audience because of the long time he has spent overseas, and since 2013, Chen has been performing rearrangements of well-known Taiwanese and Chinese melodies around the world. The performances are a collaboration of piano and traditional Chinese musical instruments, such as the erhu (二胡), gaohu (高胡) and dizi (笛子), and Chen calls the series, “East meets West.”

“I brought the ‘Love River Concerto’ to the Lincoln Center in New York, Sydney Opera House and Hong Kong Cultural Center,” says Chen. “But all this had nothing to do with the [Taiwan] government. It was all me.”
The pianist plans to continue playing the “East meets West” performances and has already been invited by various festivals in Europe to do so. Chen also holds masterclasses in Asia to pass down his skills, with the latest one to be held in Hong Kong on Nov. 27.

But he says the Taiwanese government should also think more about how it can reach out to more audiences through the arts and culture, noting that it can collaborate with artists and musicians who are already performing on international stages, because “we are the front-line performers.”

“Music has no language boundaries, so it can actually be used for a lot of cultural or diplomatic exchange, including across the [Taiwan] Strait,” says Chen. “It’s the best soft power.”

Friday, November 25, 2016

若手音楽家を世界の舞台へ 台湾の有名ピアニストの思い

Interview by The Central News Agency

16 Nov , 2016


(中央社)台湾で生まれ、国際的に活躍するピアニストのチェン・ルイビン(陳瑞斌)さん。チェンさんは近年、演奏団の創設や講座の開催などを通じ、台湾の若手音楽家を世界の舞台に羽ばたかせようと努力を続けている。チェンさんは今後の台湾の音楽振興政策のあり方について中央社に語った。 

「音楽の振興は文化部だけに頼ってはいけない」。制度化された、多部門連携での政策によってのみ、文化を発展させられるとチェンさんは力説する。教育部の児童に対する芸術教育から音楽団体への寄附に対する財政部の税額控除など、改善の余地は大いにあるという。 

設備面についても意見を述べたチェンさん。7080台のピアノが大学や地方自治体の文化センターに放置されていることを例に挙げ、台湾はハード面では高水準にある一方、市場を広げる良い政策がなく、音楽家の演奏機会が不足していると苦言を呈した。 

チェンさんは、音楽施設や芸術センターの運営において、フランスを参考にするほか、観客に定期的に会場に足を運んでもらえるよう、シーズンチケットの販売など長期的な取り組みを行うべきだと提案した。 

来年もスケジュールはびっしりだと笑うチェンさん。南部の屏東や嘉義で演奏を行うほか、米国やスペイン、コスタリア、ポーランドなどでも演奏会を開く予定だという。 


Comprehensive policy needed to sustain cultural development: pianist





Interview by The Central News Agency

14 Nov , 2016

Taiwan needs to have a more comprehensive government policy and better operation models for art institutes to promote culture and make it sustainable, a renowned Taiwanese artist told CNA recently.
Chen Rueibin (陳瑞斌), who has won 18 medals in various international piano competitions and performs worldwide, said a government-led, cross-department cultural policy is needed to make art thrive.
Taiwan is not short of top-level facilities but lacks a wholesome market to promote, for example, music, Chen said.
There are nearly 80 Steinway pianos in cultural centers and universities across Taiwan lying unused, because there are not enough concerts for pianists, Chen said.
"Promoting music is not the sole responsibility of the Culture Ministry," Chen said, stressing that it should involve other government agencies, including the Education Ministry.
The cultivation of a sense of appreciation of art and music should start at an early age, Chen said.
Local opera houses or music halls should also adopt more competitive business models, Chen said, suggesting that they could introduce season tickets, as is common practice in some foreign countries.
That way, audiences are more likely to develop long-term commitment to the art programs institutes have to offer instead of losing their interest after watching just one performance, he said.

Rueibin Chen 陳瑞斌 ,The Yellow River Piano Concerto 黃河鋼琴協奏曲




Recent performance of the iconic Yellow River Concerto-live broadcasted on Yahoo! I performed this first in HongKong, Tianjin then Shanghai at the World Expo and in US w the amazing Los Angeles Philharmonic w/15K audience at the Hollywood Bowl. Hope you enjoy! Oh ... in case you are wondering ... it's orchestrated for western instruments only or with Chinese traditional instruments 😀


Rueibin Chen 陳瑞斌 The Yellow River Piano Concerto 黃河鋼琴協奏曲

I. 黃河船夫曲 Yellow River Boatman's Song 
II. 黃河頌 Ode to the Yellow River 
III. 黃河憤 The Wrath of the Yellow River 
Iv. 保衛黃河 Defend the Yellow River 


https://youtu.be/0u8lwD2bBfcj

masterclass in HK!

I look forward to sharing my musical journey growing up in Austria and experience from winning medals at the Chopin,Rubinstein and Rachmaninoff International Piano Competitions at the upcoming masterclass in HK!